Believe it or not, when I started working for A Journey Through Learning in August, my oldest did NOT like lapbooking.  He would practically refuse to do a lapbook.

We finally sat down and talked about why…it was because the first five lapbooks we attempted were so challenging, and he really didn’t like the subject matter.  He also struggled because many require a lot of writing.  He is dysgraphic, so writing is a challenge.

So, I asked Paula and Nancy what I could do to help.  First they sent me some high interest lapbooks for him to work on.  Specifically the Reptiles lapbook.

He absolutely loved this lapbook.  He learned about different reptiles, and found the instructions so easy to follow, that he able to complete it on his own.

Just the other day, he said

“I am a smart boy now that I can lapbook”

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It seems that those harder to follow, more complicated lapbooks really had him believing he couldn’t lapbook and that he was not smart.

Finding a lapbook that interests you child is key.  Next find out how best to meet their needs.  Some moms will sit down with their child have the child tell the mom what to write down.  Others will allow the child to type their answers on the computer and print it off on sticky paper, then allow the student to stick the answers on the mini books.

I only assign a minibook or two per lapbook per day.  This keeps the lapbooks from being overwhelming.

For coloring the lapbooks, you can allow your child to use colored pencils, pastel chalks, oil pastels, crayon, and even water color paints.

To do the water color paints, you will want to copy the area to be painted onto a separate piece of paper, then once painted and dried, cut and paste to that mini book.

I have also found that spending a bit more on colored file folders really helps my children want to lapbook more.

Lapbooking is a very creative way to learn new information.  When the child finishes a lapbook, they have something they are proud of to show to their friends and relative.

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